Home Fiction - Year IV - Number 22 - March 2019

Fiction - Year IV - Number 22 - March 2019

    AN ATTACK ON SCHOOL PREMISES by Andrea Taylor

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    AN ATTACK ON SCHOOL PREMISESby Andrea Taylor They gathered the entire staff in the auditorium after dismissal and told us about the sexual assault that occurred in the staff parking lot early that morning. The...

    ANCHORS AWEIGH by Alan Berger

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    ANCHORS AWEIGHby Alan Berger We told and tell people we met in Church.At St. Patrick’s Cathedral yet.That would be a falsehood, but she liked saying it. She called herself “A romantic embellisher”.We met within sighting...

    A WALK BY THE RIVER by Josh Greenfield

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    A WALK BY THE RIVERby Josh Greenfield There are chemically induced medical conditions that require more than a good sponsor and strict attention to The Steps, many in fact. There is an entire pharmacological industry...

    THE ARTIST AS AN OLD MAN by Benjamin Haimowitz

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    THE ARTIST AS AN OLD MANby Benjamin Haimowitz For eleven years since the shaking caused by Parkinson’s disease made life at home with him impossible, Steven’s grandfather had been in a facility for the chronically...

    CLOSING TIME by Edith Boyd

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    CLOSING TIMEby Edith Boyd Mr. Colton’s wife sounded nice on the phone. She called the store often, and when she did, I got a good feeling, except when she was upset about one of their...

    THE COOKIEMEISTER By Stan Dryer (Frank Bequaert)

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    THE COOKIEMEISTERby Stan Dryer Childhood memories come and go. An image on television, a friend’s joke or a single word can trigger an explosion of memories, a chain of remembrance plucked out of the past....

    TWO THOUSAND AND EIGHTY-SEVEN by Trevor Love

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    TWO THOUSAND AND EIGHTY-SEVENby Trevor Love You have two thousand words, two thousand and eighty-seven words to tell a story. Can you do it? Two thousand and sixty-five. Two thousand and sixty-one. Can you do...

    THE GREMLIN IN THE BALCONY by Jonathan Baker

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    THE GREMLIN IN THE BALCONYby Jonathan Baker Today ought to be like any other Wednesday for Jackson Tolliver. He will leave his office at five-thirty on the dot and ride the train uptown to his...

    NO SCUM by Michael Stanek

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    NO SCUMby Michael C. Stanek   Klaus knew somebody had been there. The signs his commanding officer told them to look for were everywhere. Folded clothing washed to death, unsoiled, stale, scattered across the bed possibly for...

    MEANINGLESS by David Norwood

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    MEANINGLESSby David Norwood I looked forward to when the grounds across campus were cut. It happened every two weeks, and today was one of those days, and it just so happened to be the last...