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    THE CAPPUCCINO by David Heath

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    THE CAPPUCCINOBy David Heath  Jackie Jacobs, helping sort and organize clothing items donated for the church rummage sale, came across a woman’s tangerine linen jacket just like the one...

    SOMEDAY I’LL BE PRESIDENT by Daniel White

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    SOMEDAY I’LL BE PRESIDENTby D.S. White    What to do? What to do? That was the question.Today we would graduate together, Michael, Charles, Tony and I. All gentlemen. Scholars, maybe. Learned, to a degree....

    TARIFF by Richard Charles Schaefer

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    TARIFFBy Richard Charles Schaefer The guy I’m replacing didn’t show up today, so Heather (who calls me Brian, even though my name’s Dustin) shows me around the office. This...

    THE CASKET OF ETERNAL WINTER by Steve Passey

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    I had not much for work, and I moved back into my mother’s house. She asked me to go to my uncle’s place to shovel snow for him because he’d had a...

    APPROXIMATE by Mark Jacobs

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    APPROXIMATEby Mark Jacobs “So how much does Beth tell you about me?”“You know us, Edna. We talk.”“About my sex life?”“We talk about a lot of things. It’s what keeps...

    THE ANNIVERSARY by Renato Barucco

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    THE ANNIVERSARYRenato Barucco He lies immobile under the sheets, arms at his sides and legs straight, like a corpse in a coffin but with eyes wide open, staring at...

    A GUEST AT THE CLUB by Henry Simpson

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    A GUEST AT THE CLUBby Henry Simpson “That was a delightful performance, counselor,” said a man with a voice that easily pierced the sound and fury of the courthouse...

    HUNTER AND HUNTED by Judy Bee and Antaeus

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    HUNTER AND HUNTEDby Judy Bee and Antaeus Dudleyville, Arizona, population 959The blond-haired young man, whose mother called him "Angel Face," clutched the knife tightly as he stalked me through...

    TERRIBLE BLUE by Peter Hoppock

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        TERRIBLE BLUEBy Peter Hoppock    The pure blue sky peals in Barton’s ears like a single note from a church organ; harsh and unrelenting enough to shatter the thick glass of the picture window...